2013/06/23

Kabuki

Kabuki is one of the major types of classical theater in Japan. It was developed as a form of popular entertainment for common people in the Edo period. The history of kabuki began in the early Edo period when Izumo no Okuni, possibly a miko of Izumo Taisha, began performing a new style of dance drama.

Time has passed, Kabuki’s rule was changed, male actors played both female and male characters. And now, Kabuki is very popular from foreign tourists.


See also
*Japanese
*Chinese
*List of Japanese culture


Sumo

Sumo is the national sports of Japan. Two wrestlers wearing only loincloths, fight in a sumo ring. Each match is over very quickly. One wrestler wins when he pushes his opponent out of the ring or forces him to touch the ground with any part of his body.

These are 700 sumo wrestlers, in ascending order of the ranking system, zyonokuchi, zyonidan, sandanme, makushita, zyuryo, komusubi, sekiwake, and ōzeki. At the pinnacle of the ranking is yokozuna. Six great championships are held every year. The bout lasts for 15 days.


See also
*Japanese
*Chinese
*List of Japanese culture


Shogi / Japanese chess

Shogi is a Japanese form of chess. It originated in India and was introduced to Japan via China and Korea. Shogi, like chess, is played by moving pieces on a board. The board has 81 squares, 9 by 9. Each player has 20 pieces, which vary in power.

The distinctive difference of shogi from chess is that you can use captured enemy pieces as your own pieces. The final object is to checkmate the opposing king.


See also
*Japanese
*Chinese
*List of Japanese culture

Rock-scissors-paper

Janken is played to decide who goes first, how to choose turns, or who will be "it" in a game of tag. Janken is a one-handed gesture game with three different signs which represent rock(called gu in Japanese), scissors(choki) and paper(pa).

Everyone has to make one of those three signs at the same time after shouting "Jan-ken-pon!" Rock wins against scissors, and scissors wins against paper, and paper wins against rock. When everybody makes the same sign or when there is at least one of all three signs shown, it is called aiko or a draw and everyone tries again until someone wins.


See also
*Japanese
*Chinese


Haiku

Haiku is one form of Japanese short poetry. It is very compact and consists of only 17 syllables. They are arranged in three lines of 5, 7 and 5 syllables each.

The basic rule is to include a word reflecting one of the four seasons. Thus the themes of haiku are mainly nature and life. The great haiku poet Matsuo Basho(1644-1694) elevated haiku to a highly refined art. Even today Haiku is enjoyed by many people in Japan.


See also
*Japanese
*Chinese
*List of Japanese culture